News

July 13, 2014

ZEV Amendments to be Discussed at July 14, 2014 Workshop in Sacramento

On Monday (July 14, 2014), the California Air Resources Board (CARB) will hold workshop at 10 am PST in Sacramento to discuss changes that are being considered for the ZEV program.

According to the Staff presentation that was released Friday, the workshop will focus on amendments that would make the percent of sales requirement for Intermediate Volume Manufacturers (IVMs) more consistent with the percent of sales requirement applicable to Large Volume Manufacturers (LVMs).  IVMs include manufacturers like JLR, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Subaru and Volvo.  If adopted, the percent of sales requirement for IVMs would, according to projections by CARB, change from 44% in 2025 to 18.4% in 2025 (assuming IVMs use TZEVs to comply).

At the workshop, CARB also intends to discuss changes that would reduce the compliance burden for IVMs that want the flexibility to pool compliance in ZEV states and to earn a reduced TZEV requirement. Currently, to have this flexibility, IVMs must deliver ZEVs to S.177 states prior to 2018, however, under the modifications being considered by CARB, IVMs would get an extra two years to comply with this requirement.

CARB will discuss the fast refueling and clarifying language related to that provision.

The schedule for finalizing the modifications that will be discussed at the workshop calls for the proposed amendments to be issued for public comment in early September and a Board Hearing in late October.

Persons unable to attend in person may take part via webcast. The broadcast can be accessed on the day of the workshop at: http://www.calepa.ca.gov/broadcast/?BD0=1

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